Who Believes in Indians?

[vc_row][vc_column][ultimate_heading main_heading=”UN MAGAZINE 12.1 Who Believes in Indians? Suzanne Kite” margin_design_tab_text=””][/ultimate_heading][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_single_image image=”1925″ img_size=”Full” alignment=”center” onclick=”custom_link” link=”http://unprojects.org.au/magazine/issues/issue-12-1/who-believes-in-indians/”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][ultimate_heading main_heading=”American contemporary mythologies spring from American founding mythologies. The events of Columbus’ arrival, the American revolution, and the signing of the Constitution washed away terra nullius to reveal the American nation. The enduring desire to avoid facts or truths is evident in America today via the fervor for conspiracy theory.1 Nearly fifty per cent of Americans believe in at least one conspiracy theory.2 Aliens, Illuminati, National Security Agency (NSA) surveillance, the Kennedy assassination, hauntings, Pentagon Papers, 9/11 was an inside job; theories only remain theories for as long as it takes to prove them. For Native Americans (Indians) and other peoples targeted by the United States Government, theories prove true. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) was embedded in the American Indian Movement, just as the FBI has targeted ‘black identity extremist groups’. Those targeted, Native and otherwise, are well aware that as the violence of American mythology pours across the continent; it was and is ‘assimilation or death’. ‘Manifest Destiny’ is the term used to describe the continental takeover by settlers and their surveillance. While it is often interpreted primarily as symbolising ownership of space, Manifest Destiny also articulates taking ownership over time and reconfiguring it into a linear, one way street: progression towards apocalypse.” heading_tag=”h6″ margin_design_tab_text=””][/ultimate_heading][/vc_column][/vc_row]